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IOT Data Creative

Overview

By 2025, our homes and businesses will be enmeshed in the Internet of Things, a complex web of billions of digitally connected devices, ranging from washing machines and refrigerators to smart entertainment systems and energy control centres, all constantly talking to each other and us. A measure of how all-encompassing the IoT will become can be seen in the steep growth in sales of connected devices. The global market for IoT technology will grow from $1.9 trillion in 2013 to $7.1 trillion in 2020, according to IDC Research. These devices will restock food supplies, monitor our health and sleeping patterns, manage our day-to-day work and leisure plans, and automatically call for help if they detect a fault. But they will also present us – and their makers – with a major headache: how to make sense of the deluge of real time data they are constantly producing in a way that will allow us to improve both our lives and future versions of the devices themselves. It’s a challenge that will give birth to a whole new global industry of analysts and experts which can already been seen emerging today. Demand for IoT systems software developers rose by 215% in 2016 and information security analysts by 113%, according to Wanted Analytics research. Big data analytics and the Internet of Things (IoT) will create 182,000 new jobs in the UK and add £322bn to the economy by 2020, research from the Centre for Economics and Business Research reveals. But behind the skilled technologists who will run the infrastructure of the IoT, there will be another army of workers dedicated to sifting through the data to find the stories that it is trying to tell us all. As IoT and the proliferation of big data continues to rise, we’re seeing strong demand for data scientists and back-end engineers who can collect, organise, analyse and architect these disparate sources of data,’ says Ryan Johnson, categories director for global freelance marketplace Upwork. The worldwide hunt to find and train the people who will surf tomorrow’s tsunami of data has already begun. In early 2016, MIT ran a 6-week course called Internet of Things: Roadmap to a Connected World. It was aimed at ‘individuals who want to leverage the Internet of Things to address business challenges including cybersecurity, system architecture, and data management.’ By 2025, universities and colleges will be teaching undergraduates how to turn the raw data from the Internet of Things into compelling narratives that help to make us better people living better lives, and make the world as a whole a better place.

Job Description

Internet of Things Data Creatives will be central to the future development of the vast web of connected devices that will soon form a protective net around the health, home and work life and entertainment of billions of people. It will be their job to sift through the waves of data being generated each day by devices in our clothes, our homes, our cars and our offices and find meaningful and useful ways to tell us what all that information is saying. They will need to have three key talents: a finely honed ability to recognise patterns, a skill at asking sharp and difficult questions, and a natural flair for storytelling. Pattern recognition will be vital for spotting what is – and what isn’t – important in what the devices are telling each other, and us. The noise of data will be deafening and so there will be a need for a new role in filtering and interpreting this data, says a report titled People-Centred Design for the Internet of Things. Internet of Things Data Creatives will be trained to notice patterns in the data that indicate something that we should know about our health, the way that we drive our car, or the energy use of our households. Then they will use their storytelling skills to design an eye-catching and easily digestible way to communicate the information to us, either online or through future generations of virtual and augmented reality tools. ‘These creatives will be our translators, turning data into 3D and VR infographics and images that teach us, over months and years, how to look after our health better, to run our homes more enjoyably and cost-effectively, or drive our cars more safely,’ says Tom Savigar, partner at The Future Laboratory. Data Creatives will also have a major part to play in helping technology brands and businesses to develop new and improved versions of existing IoT systems. They will be the gatekeepers of what works and what doesn’t – culturally, technologically and emotionally – in tomorrow’s hyperconnected world. Data Creatives will analyse the streams of feedback, from both devices and customers, to create visual aids that help to constantly super-charge functionality and inform new waves of technological innovation. As Andrew Caleya Chetty, partner at Thingful, a global search engine for the Internet of Things, says, ‘In five to 10 years, these people will be making actionable decisions about the way that different areas of data link and collaborate. ‘Their expertise will show businesses how to keep improving and upgrading IoT networks and products to ensure that they address real customer needs.’ Creative and critical thinking will be central to the data creative’s role of ensuring that connected consumer products are valuable both to businesses and their customers. A knowledge of engineering, technology, sensors and communications will be helpful too for graduates hoping to enter this fascinating and challenging new area of work. Caleya Chetty says, ‘Deep specialists can create solutions around the hardware and software technologies. ‘But for thinking and visioning about how best IoT products and services can connect people and brands you need creative thinkers, and people with arts and culture skills and backgrounds will increasingly provide those vital insights. ‘You need those people, with different experiences and different skillsets, to be able to problem-solve and find value, which is the most important thing within a business.’ However, perhaps the most vital talent of all for these future workers will be a spirit of entrepreneurial daring. The best – and most sought-after – members of this profession will be the ones who are constantly asking hard questions about how to disrupt the Internet of Things in order to make it better As digital news outlet Quartz says, ‘In the field of consumer IoT, the greatest benefits usually come from people doing the challenging intellectual and strategic work to find the kind of issue-based questions that could unearth potentially world-changing solutions.’

Application Form

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